Pollard Theatre Company Plugged In

By Larry Laneer
July 22, 2020

As far as the theatrical world goes, not much good has come out of this pandemic, but we have some artists giving it their best shot. One delightful surprise has been Pollard Theatre Company Plugged In. PTC’s artistic director, W. Jerome Stevenson, has conducted video interviews with some of our leading theatrical artists and made them available on the company’s web site. The interviews are in the tradition of James Lipton on television’s Inside the Actors Studio. You hear the interviewees say their favorite curse word.

Stevenson said the idea for the program originated with the company’s board of directors. All interviewees have worked at some time with PTC.

Theatergoers have seen the work of these artists for years, if not decades. It’s nice to get to know them personally and hear their experiences. The director/choreographer/actor Matthew Sipress speaks movingly about being in Hello, Dolly! on Broadway and seeing Carol Channing at the top of the stairs in the title number. Choreographer Hui Cha Poos and Stevenson have a thoughtful discussion about the art and current issues of the day. (Her dances for PTC’s In the Heights in 2014 still linger in my mind.)

Kolby Kindle, a young actor from Edmond who was in In the Heights, has embarked on a successful career in touring musicals. He was in Australia with Come From Away when theater shut down. Brenda Williams and Elin Bhaird detail their long careers on the stage. In aggregate, how many shows have theatergoers seen these two wonderful actors in? It must be in the high two figures, if not three.

And anyone would benefit from spending time with the great Albert Bostick, who grew up in the 7th Ward of New Orleans. Bostick is a master teacher and performer who has worked in about every art form, both performing and graphic.

Stevenson conducted the interviews remotely, and they all run about an hour. He always asks about the artist’s “point of no return,” when they knew theater was to be their world. We hear about their education and training and how they broke into their first theatrical jobs. Every interview is laced with humor; some are disturbing.

Stevenson said he hopes to continue these interviews “even after we’ve found a way back to our preferred art.” It would be a treat to see our top theatrical artists interviewed live with a chance for questions from the audience.

More episodes of Pollard Theatre Company Plugged In will be available, including one soon with Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre artistic director Donald Jordan.

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