Review: Finding Neverland

Cast of Finding Neverland                                                                                         Photo by Jeremy Daniel

By Larry Laneer
March 16, 2018

It will take more than fairy dust to get the musical Finding Neverland off the ground. Fairy dust: I guess that’s what the glittery stuff swirling around the stage is. Even the shaggy dog that elicits entrance “aaws” isn’t enough.

Based on the play The Man Who Was Peter Pan by Allan Knee and on the 2004 motion picture Finding Neverland, both of which were inspired by true events, the show is about
J. M. Barrie and his writing the play Peter Pan. But shows about writing are hard to do, because writing consists mainly of someone sitting and staring at a blank piece of paper (or blank computer screen). So the creators (Gary Barlow and Eliot Kennedy, music and lyrics; James Graham, book) tell about Barrie’s inspiration for Peter Pan, to wit, a widow with four rambunctious boys.

What the production’s thin story line lacks in substance, it tries to make up for in volume. The thumping, seat-shaking first-act finale is louder than the second-act finale.

Now at the Thelma Gaylord as part of the OKC Broadway touring series, the show engages the audience visually but falls flat dramatically. The pop score is pleasant enough. Suttirat Anne Larlarb’s period costumes are fine.

But Scott Pask’s scenic design, Kenneth Posner’s lighting, and projections by Jon Driscoll create impressive visuals. The set consists mainly of flat wings and a backdrop on which the projections depict 1903 London streets, an empty stage, verdant Kensington Gardens, a roiling sea, billowing clouds, other clouds that drift by a full moon, and what looks like a Barrie nightmare worthy of The Twilight Zone. The high tech is fine, but what Posner’s lighting does with shadows is equally effective. And projecting shadows is about as low tech as you can get. Other three-dimensional set pieces and props add various degrees of realism. This design team also did the Broadway production of 2015-2016. The director Diane Paulus and choreographer Mia Michaels from the Broadway show staged this version.

Will Ray gets lots of stage time as Barrie, while the bubbly Lael Van Keuren plays the widow. None other than John Davidson (yes, of Hollywood Squares fame) plays the American theatrical producer who puts Peter Pan on the boards. Davidson’s long, gray ponytail surely would have looked unusual for a man in the character’s position in 1903 London.

A highly synthesized eight-piece band accompanies the show. This ranks about average for a touring production orchestra.

At one point, Barrie advises the real Peter, inspiration for the Pan, “Life is too absurd to be taken seriously.” In these days and times, it’s hard to argue with that.

Finding Neverland by James Graham (book) and Gary Barlow and Eliot Kennedy (music and lyrics)
OKC Broadway
8:00 p.m., Friday, March 16
2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., Saturday, March 17
2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m., Sunday March 18
Thelma Gaylord Performing Arts Theatre, Civic Center Music Hall
201 N. Walker Ave.
$44-$119
405-297-2264

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