Review: The SpongeBob Musical

Daria Pilar Redus, Lorenzo Pugliese, and Beau Bradshaw in The SpongeBob Musical  Photo by Jeremy Daniel

By Larry Laneer
November 13, 2019

When you create a musical based on a television cartoon, you can’t expect to come up with much more than a cartoon musical. That’s what you have in The SpongeBob Musical, now playing at the Thelma Gaylord. Presented by OKC Broadway, this is the touring version of the Broadway production that ran in 2017-2018 to some acclaim.

The show’s protagonist, SpongeBob SquarePants, is a, well, sponge who lives in Bikini Bottom at the bottom of the ocean. By “sponge,” I mean “a porous rubber or cellulose product used similarly to a sponge,” that is, “an elastic porous mass of interlacing horny fibers that forms the internal skeleton of various marine animals (phylum Porifera) and is able when wetted to absorb water.” SpongeBob is not a sponge in the sense of “one who habitually depends on others for maintenance or for support.” Just to clarify.

Kyle Jarrow wrote the book, and original songs are by a Grammy award show worth of musicians, including among others Sara Bareilles, Lady Antebellum, Cyndi Lauper, John Legend, Panic! at the Disco, They Might Be Giants, and The Flaming Lips. The Flaming Lips! Their appealing anthem “Tomorrow Is” closes the first act. The composer Tom Kitt (Next to Normal) has wrangled the pop/rock songs into a cohesive score, keeping the show from sounding too composed by committee.

The literary level of this musical rates about the same as a middling television cartoon with anodyne sentiments, corny dialog, and sight gags worthy of the Road Runner. Once the story settles in, a natural disaster threatens Bikini Bottom. SpongeBob leads the effort to save the town while dealing with a local villain.

The same creative team who did the Broadway production created this version. Directed by Tina Landau with choreography by Christopher Gattelli, the show goes full blast visually, dramatically, and musically. David Zinn’s scenic and costume designs run just about the gamut of the color spectrum with everything turned up to full brightness. The costumes are regular clothes for human-like characters such as SpongeBob but run more cartoonish for the “vast array of undersea creatures” played by the supporting cast.

The show counters its dramatic inanity with visual spectacle and performances that are so over-the-top, they’re kind of sweet. Lorenzo Pugliese gives a winning performance in the title role. You can’t help but like SpongeBob and pull for him. As Squidward Q. Tentacles (remember, we’re dealing with cartoon characters here), Cody Cooley just about steals the show. His four-legged tap dance in the second act is the show’s highlight. Beau Bradshaw does a fine job as Patrick Star, a loveable oaf of an undersea slacker. Daria Pilar Redus plays Sandy Cheeks, who is a squirrel. By “squirrel,” I mean “any of various arboreal rodents of the genus Sciurus and related genera, usu. with gray or reddish-brown fur and a long, flexible, bushy tail.” If the show explained why a squirrel lives at the bottom of the ocean in Bikini Bottom, it went right by me unnoticed. The busy supporting cast gives strong performances.

Before the show, I saw more booster seats and people sized to need them than you see at most musicals. Maybe they got a lot out of this one. If you’re a fan of cartoon musicals, SpongeBob may be the show for you.

The SpongeBob Musical by Kyle Jarrow (book) and various artists (music/lyrics)
OKC Broadway
7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 8:00 p.m. Friday, 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. Saturday,
1:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Sunday, through November 17
Thelma Gaylord Performing Arts Theatre
201 N. Walker Ave.
405-594-8300

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