Review: Romeo and Juliet

Nikki Mar as Juliet                      Photo by April Porterfield

By Larry Laneer
February 24, 2020

Oklahoma Shakespeare has revamped how it will do shows, and the change looks highly promising. They plan to do most plays at their space on the Paseo and make improvements to that challenging venue. If this longtime, venerable company can make this change work, we should have a lot of quality theater ahead.

A case in point is Romeo and Juliet, in a wildly uneven production now at the company’s Paseo space. The director Kris Kuss has trimmed the script judiciously and cast some excellent actors in key roles.

The first act is a good cure for insomnia. The second act comes alive, stays taut, and picks up the pace. Kuss inserts the intermission right after Romeo kills Tybalt and the Prince banishes him from Verona. Kuss’s staging is especially strong from the point Juliet drinks the potion Friar Lawrence gives her and on until the end of the play. The ending is so effective it even overcomes some maudlin recorded music that threatens to drown out the Prince’s final words.

The first act features Romeo, but the second act belongs to Juliet, played here in an outstanding performance by the young Nikki Mar. The second act begins with Juliet’s soliloquy (“Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds, towards Phoebus’ lodging!”). This soliloquy had never stood out to me, but Mar delivers it with such understated strength, it brings up the quality of the production. Juliet is in ecstasy over her marriage to Romeo. But the speech is interrupted by Nurse bringing the news Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin, has been killed by her husband. Mar handles the transformation from joyousness to gloom and conflict with the skill of a seasoned professional. Theatergoers should look forward to seeing her in more roles.

Juliet contrasts with the callow Romeo played by Bryan Lewis, who bears an uncanny resemblance to the young Joaquin Phoenix. At times, his performance hints slightly at some of Phoenix’s more out there work.

Like the entire production, the acting ticks up a notch or three in the second act, with two exceptions. Theatergoers will not be surprised to read those exceptions are the always solid Renee Krapff as Nurse and the great Hal Kohlman and his prodigious beard as Friar Lawrence, who are both first rate from the moment they step on stage. In this production, Krapff’s Nurse is about the only comic relief you get and, per usual, she nails both the comedy and tragedy. In any role, Kohlman commands the stage or provides firm support, depending on what the part and scene demand.

By the end, Michael Page and Mariah Warren do fine jobs as Lord and Lady Capulet. Kevin Cook as Benvolio, Marcus Popoff as Tybalt, and Paxton Kliewer as Paris are also sharp until their characters are killed or become irrelevant. It’s a mystery why Kuss changed Mercutio to Mercutia and cast Allie Alexander in the role. It’s more of a mystery why he has Alexander play the role in male drag, although she handles it with aplomb. The slow-motion knife fighting looks hokey.

Lloyd Cracknell’s costumes set the play in the 18th century. Ruffled shirtsleeves shoot from some of the men’s jackets. Rebekah Garrett’s lighting is subtlety effective.

Oklahoma Shakespeare has been in business since 1985. It’s hard for any theater company—or any kind of company—to last 35 years. But OS has done it by changing with the times, and it looks like they are continuing to do so. Good for them (and us).

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Oklahoma Shakespeare
8:00 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, 2:00 p.m. Sundays, through March 1
2920 Paseo
1-800-838-3006